Is Your LinkedIn Email For Sale or Trade?

I’m fairly open about how people connect on LinkedIn. You want to be an open networker, I’m with you. You want to be a closed networker, hey if it works for you great. Whichever way you choose you still have a obligation to those you connect with to guard the information you have gained through the connection. It really would not be cool to do something like downloading your contacts to a csv file and then trade your file with others like Topp’s Baseball cards.

Here is a LinkedIn message that I received (I’ve chosen to remove the identifying information. I have left some references so that you will recognize the message should you receive it) Continue reading Is Your LinkedIn Email For Sale or Trade?

Enhance Your Networking with LinkedIn (part 3 of 10)

Enhance and Expand Your Network
The core of LinkedIn revolves around connecting to other business professionals, which is networking.  Networking exclusively on LinkedIn, though, ignores the human element of face to face interaction.  Understanding, once again that LinkedIn is a tool, how do you use it to enhance your other networking?
I do a lot of networking in my local chamber.  When I first joined the chamber I hadn’t really been active on LinkedIn.  At meetings I would try to meet as many people as possible, but in a room full of 50 people and only 30 minutes of open networking it was hard to meet everyone.
For those I did not meet I could try again at the next meeting, but that depended upon whether or not they returned.  At the meetings they photocopied everyone’s business card and each person got a copy.  From that I could also call those I had not met to try to set up a meeting.  Other than a name on a card, though, there was no connection.
LinkedIn changed that.  I found that with LinkedIn, I could connect to those that I hadn’t had a chance to meet.  Then I could review their LinkedIn profiles to determine who were the most beneficial to meet.  I also found that if they were at the next chamber meeting, that the LinkedIn connection provided a great way to break the ice.
In the end it’s a two way street.  LinkedIn provides a level of connectivity until I can strengthen the networking relationship through a face to face meeting.  And the chamber meeting provides a fresh batch of potential LinkedIn connections.
Some of my best networking relationships have developed from simply being at the same networking event, connecting on LinkedIn, and then finally taking it offline and meeting in person.
So here’s what you should be doing.  After every networking event, send a LinkedIn connection invite to those you did not get a chance to meet.  (Here’s where you want to customize that LinkedIn invitation. )  Send the following invitation:
Joe,
We crossed paths at the Chamber (or whatever event it was) today but did not get a chance to meet you in person.  I am using LinkedIn to enhance my Chamber networking and would like to add you to my LinkedIn network.
Sean Nelson (I always add my last name since I do not know this person yet)
More often then not, this leads to a LinkedIn connection.  Now it’s up to you to take it further to develop the relationship.  Remember it’s not about adding just another connection; it’s about expanding and enhancing your network.  Only send the invite to those that you want to get to know.

The core of LinkedIn revolves around connecting to other business professionals, which is primarily networking.  Networking exclusively on LinkedIn, though, ignores the human element of face to face interaction.  Understanding, once again that LinkedIn is a tool, how do you use it to enhance your other networking?

I do a lot of networking in my local chamber.  When I first joined the chamber in the spring of 1996 I had not yet joined LinkedIn.  At meetings I would try to meet as many people as possible, but in a room full of 50 people and only 30 minutes of open networking it was hard to meet everyone.

At each meeting they would  photocopy all of the business cards and each attendee received a copy.   From that I could call those I had not met to try to set up a meeting.  Other than a name on a card, though, there was no connection.  I could also try again at the next meeting if they returned.

LinkedIn changed that.  I found that with LinkedIn, I could connect to those that I hadn’t had a chance to meet.  Then I could review their LinkedIn profiles to determine who were the most beneficial to meet.  I also found that if they were at the next chamber meeting, that the LinkedIn connection provided a great way to break the ice.

In the end it’s a two way street.  LinkedIn provides a level of connectivity until I can strengthen the networking relationship through a face to face meeting.  And the chamber meeting provides a fresh batch of potential LinkedIn connections.

Some of my best networking relationships have developed from simply being at the same networking event, connecting on LinkedIn, and then finally taking it offline and meeting in person.

So here’s what you should be doing.  After every networking event, send a LinkedIn connection invite to those you did not get a chance to meet.  (Here’s where you want to customize that LinkedIn invitation. )  Send the following invitation: Continue reading Enhance Your Networking with LinkedIn (part 3 of 10)

Social Networking Stats-Regular Users Vs. Total Members

A lot gets written up in press releases, blog posts, Tweets, and other communications about the number of members on the various sites.   There’s a huge difference though between the number of users each site has and the number of users who are consistently interacting with others.

I recently came across some statistics that I’m going to share.   These statistics were revealed in a study by Anderson Analytics and you can view the report by clicking on the company name.   The study estimates that there are 110 million people who regularly use Social Networking Sites (SNS).

On average, users of SNS sites login to the sites 5 days a week, 4 times a day and spend about 1 hour on SNS each day.   While not explicitly stated this is what I would assume that they consider a regular user. So here are the top sites with the number of users and the number of regular users in parentheses.