LinkedIn User Guide

Mondays are the day that I post my most significant blog post for the week.  If you’re looking for Part 2 in the 10 Part LinkedIn series it will be released on Monday.
One of the statements I made in Part 1 was that I wasn’t sure why people chose to sign up for a LinkedIn account and then did nothing.  Someone posted a comment to the blog stating that most people don’t know what to do once they sign up for an account.
I can understand that lack of knowledge would lead to lack of activity.  The next question I have, though, is “why is anyone letting a lack of knowledge get in the way of a potential resource that can help you grow your network, develop relationships, and drive new business?”
With any new tool, technology, etc. you have the choice in how long it takes to go from a novice to an effective user.
You can choose to do nothing
You can choose to learn it on your own
You can choose to tap into the knowledge of others
You can choose to outsource the activity
When I started to learn how to use LinkedIn I chose #2 and #3.  First I looked around the site to see if I could figure it out on my own.  While I learned the basics I decided I would be better served tapping into the knowledge of others to speed up the learning curve.
I started reading any blog I could find that talked about LinkedIn.  At the time there weren’t that many so I bought a LinkedIn ebook.  This one ebook provided the framework I needed to build a foundation of knowledge.  It also introduced me to some tips and strategies to put to work immediately.
The book I purchased was a high level overview of LinkedIn.  When I decided to write my first LinkedIn ebook I decided I would take the opposite approach and write a very detailed book.  I also decided to base the book chapters on the navigational structure of LinkedIn, making it a great reference tool.  Have a question about Groups, go to the Groups chapter.
In June I released the revision of my first book re-titled as the “LinkedIn MBA”.  I also wrote a workbook, the “LinkedIn MBA Workbook” to help people create a “killer” profile, begin building their credibility, and extend their reach.  Combined the two form a perfect resource for someone who has a LinkedIn account but is not sure what they should be doing.
The book is over 150 pages with close to 100 screenshots and the workbook is around 21 pages.  So you have a choice.  You can continue to do nothing.  You can invest the time to learn it from scratch.  Or you can invest $9.97 (the cost for the book and workbook combined) and begin putting LinkedIn to work for you as soon as today.
The question to ask yourself it what is your time worth?  The minimum wage is $7.25 so if it takes you 40 hours to learn what is in the book and work book your time in cost at a minimum would be $290.  (the average hourly rate for a LinkedIn member is actually $52.40 making the time cost $2,096.15)
The information I share on this blog is free and you can learn a lot by reading through the posts.  I just don’t have the space to provide information in as detailed a manner as in the book.  Also the blog is written based on what I find interesting each week, whereas the book is organized more on a start to finish basis.
For more information on the LinkedIn MBA and the LinkedIn MBA Work book go to http://socialmediasonar.com/book.html
Stop by next Monday for Part 2, “Why are you on LinkedIn?”, of my LinkedIn series.

LinkedIn MBA Cover 200Mondays are the day that I post my most significant blog post for the week.  If you’re looking for Part 2 in the 10 Part LinkedIn series it will be released on Monday.

One of the statements I made in Part 1 was that I wasn’t sure why people chose to sign up for a LinkedIn account and then did nothing.  Someone posted a comment to the blog stating that most people don’t know what to do once they sign up for an account.

I can understand that lack of knowledge would lead to lack of activity.  The next question I have, though, is “why is anyone letting a lack of knowledge get in the way of a potential resource that can help you grow your network, develop relationships, and drive new business?”

With any new tool, technology, etc. you have the choice in how long it takes to go from a novice to an effective user.

  • You can choose to do nothing
  • You can choose to learn it on your own
  • You can choose to tap into the knowledge of others
  • You can choose to outsource the activity

When I started to learn how to use LinkedIn I chose #2 and #3.  First I looked around the site to see if I could figure it out on my own.  While I learned the basics I decided I would be better served tapping into the knowledge of others to speed up the learning curve.

I started reading any blog I could find that talked about LinkedIn.  At the time there weren’t that many so I bought a LinkedIn ebook.  This one ebook provided the framework I needed to build a foundation of knowledge about LinkedIn.  It also introduced me to some tips and strategies to put to work immediately.

The book I purchased was a high level overview of LinkedIn.  When I decided to write my first LinkedIn ebook I decided I would take the opposite approach and write a very detailed book.  I also decided to base the book chapters on the navigational structure of LinkedIn, making it a great reference tool.  Have a question about Groups, go to the Groups chapter.

In June I released the revision of my first book re-titled as the “LinkedIn MBA”.  I also wrote a workbook, the “LinkedIn MBA Workbook” to help people create a “killer” profile, begin building their credibility, and extend their reach.  Combined the two form a perfect resource for someone who has a LinkedIn account but is not sure what they should be doing.

The book is over 150 pages with close to 100 screenshots and the workbook is around 21 pages.  So you have a choice.  You can continue to do nothing.  You can invest the time to learn it from scratch.  Or you can invest $9.97 (the cost for the book and workbook combined) and begin putting LinkedIn to work for you as soon as today.

The question to ask yourself it what is your time worth?  The minimum wage is $7.25 so if it takes you 40 hours to learn what is in the book and work book your time in cost at a minimum would be $290.  (the average hourly rate for a LinkedIn member is actually $52.40 making the time cost $2,096.15)

The information I share on this blog is free and you can learn a lot by reading through the posts.  I just don’t have the space to provide information in as detailed a manner as in the book.  Also the blog is written based on what I find interesting each week, whereas the book is organized more on a start to finish basis.

For more information on the LinkedIn MBA and the LinkedIn MBA Work book go to http://socialmediasonar.com/book.html

Stop by next Monday for Part 2, “Why are you on LinkedIn?”, of my LinkedIn series.

The Handshake Club: LinkedIn Causes Loss of Sleep

I’m often asked by people how many hours they should spend on LinkedIn each day.  The simple answer is I don’t know.  The time you spend will be dependent upon what you’re trying to do.  There are also different phases to LinkedIn (or any of the social networking sites).

When you first start to learn how to use these site they can take a lot of time.  You’re starting from a knowledge base of zero.  At this point you have a choice:

A. You can do what most people do and learn it on your own by experimenting.  To really learn it though you’d have to explore every page, every feature, and search out for free information information and blogs.  LinkedIn has a Help section that can answer many of your questions (though if you’re looking to move beyond classroom learning you need to find out how others have used LinkedIn)

This blog is a great reference for learning.

B. You can shorten the learning cycle by taking advantage of the knowledge of others.  There are several books that will tell you the basics of LinkedIn and these usually include some examples.  There are fewer books that actually talk about how people are using LinkedIn strategically.  The value of purchasing a book verses reading a blog is that the information is likely to be better organized.

For example on this blog I provide a lot of help and guidance but each weeks post is based on what I’ve recently learned or what is interesting to me this week.  The LinkedIn MBA, my “How to” and “What is” LinkedIn book, is organized based on the navigational structure of the LinkedIn site.  It makes it an great resource to read or to easily refer to when you have questions.

So back to our question about how much time does LinkedIn require.  If you choose to learn it on your own more than if you tap into others knowledge.  Either way initially you will need to try and put a hour or two in a day, but with the books the number of days or weeks required to put in this amount of time will be shortened.

Once you’ve built your foundation of knowledge you’ll move into using it to move beyond connecting to collectiing (driving business).  Once again this will require time to discover what works for you.  In the LinkedIn Marketing Secret Formula I lay out how I’ve used LinkedIn over the past year to drive business.  There are not many other resources out there to help you do this so it will require some experimentation on your part.

Try to commit a minimum of one hour a day, but each extra hour simply puts you that much ahead on the learning curve.

JD’s comic this week is one that I know well.  Since I have a real job (running my two insurance companies) I often find that I spend from 10PM to 1AM keeping  Linked Intuition up to date with new posts and other activities.  Coffee keeps me sane and moving in the morning. (JD actually sent me this cartoon at 2AM in the morning, so if you see him out in Chicago today buy him a cup of coffee.)

THE HANDSHAKE CLUB Stayed Up Too Late

J.D. Gershbein is the President of Owlish Communications, an Internet Marketing firm based in the Chicago, Illinois suburb of Vernon Hills. When he’s not helping his clients shine on LinkedIn with custom profile writing and strategic LinkedIn training, J.D. creates cartoons and comic strips that make individuals and businesses memorable. He is the creator of the comic strip, The Handshake Club™, which features such notable characters as Will Banter™ and Brandy Share ™.

The Top 5 Tactical Mistakes on LinkedIn

Last week I wrote about the top 5 mistakes on LinkedIn.  The list was made up of mistakes that were strategic in nature, and dealt with mistakes that affected your ability to monetize LinkedIn.  Today we take a look at the Top 5 mistakes from a tactical perspective.  These mistakes affect your credibility, success in connecting, and ability to generate success.

1.  Typos, Grammatical Errors, Pointless Info
If I had to choose one area that I am guilty of violating my own advice it would be this one.  Typos just happen.  I write most of my posts now in Word to avoid misspellings, yet I constantly get caught by misspelled words that are simply the wrong word spelled correctly.  “Your” instead of “you”.  “Can” is “an”.  And many others.

Its always fun to write a post that talks about typos only to receive emails from my readers correcting errors.  I still feel strongly about the subject, but I’ve come to terms that for me they will periodically occur.  In the end its a function of time and with the growth of the blog and the need to continuously add content (and run my two other companies), I’ve chosen to rely on help from my readers.  Hopefully the content is valuable and can overcome a typo here or there.

Also make sure that you are providing relevant content.  Pointless information wastes time and adds no value.

What to do:
Write online posts in a word editor.  Go back and read it after an hour or two.  You’ll see things you missed.  Review your information to confirm that it is relevant to the conversation.

2.  Canned Invitations…not personalizing your invitations

This one seems to be a topic I write about often and yet immediately after writing this post I will receive invitations using the canned LinkedIn text.  LinkedIn could resolve this issue by simply changing the included text to “Add your invitation information”.

Until then you have a choice.  Personalize the invitation and have close to a 100% positive reaction or use the canned text and have a 50/50 chance of your invitation being viewed positively.  Given the potential for someone indicating “That they don’t know you”, personalization is as much a defensive action.

Personalization can be telling the invited how you know them, referencing common connections or groups, telling the person why you want to connect, and the value you bring to the table.

What to do:
Personalize the invitation.

3.  Requesting Recommendations that haven’t been earned
Even worse is requesting an invitation from someone you don’t know.  Its not your connections job to build your credibility.

I received a request to recommend a connections work this weekend.  The problem is that I don’t know this person and have never used their services.  I connect to others I don’t know because it increases the chances of unexpected opportunities finding me.  I’m willing to help as much as possible, but writing a false recommendation isn’t one of those ways.

What to do:
Request recommendations only when earned from people you know.  Give recommendation to only those who you know and who have earned them.

4.  Keeping Your Public Profile Hidden
The people that you are connected to can view your complete profile.  But what about people outside of your network who want to know more about you?  If you have set your profile to be accessible to all members no problem.

If you haven’t you may be limiting your opportunities.  There may be reasons to keep your profile hidden, but these are few and far between.  If you want to attract opportunity you have to provide information that is viewable to all LinkedIn members.

What to do:
Make your profile viewable to the public.  “Click on the “Edit Profile” tab and at the top right click on the “Edit Public Profile Settings” text link.  Then click in the check boxes to allow all of your profile to be viewable and then save your settings.  There is a link at the bottom of the page to view your Public Profile.  Click on this to see how it looks.

5.  Taking Negative Actions
Everything you do either adds or subtracts from your online brand (I’ve said this over and over…its that important) so act prudently.  If you disagree with someone do so in a professional manner.  If you answer a question provide a well thought out answer that adds value (answering 300 question in a week may get you on LinkedIn’s weekly expert list, but what it really says is that somethings wrong with your business if you have this much time on your hands)

If you don’t want to connect Archive the invitation rather than choosing the “I don’t know this person” option.(when you choose IDK the person sending the invitation can see that you did so.  That may not matter but it creates a negative perspective about you that may not affect you but is better not existing.)

I could write for hours on this one topic but if you use common business sense you can avoid most of these.

What to do:
Use common sense.  I don’t know how many times I’ve typed up a response only to delete it once I thought  about what it said about me.

Wrap Up:
This is just a small sample of tactical errors.  Most are easy to avoid if you think about your actions before executing them.  If you wouldn’t do or say it in person don’t do it on LinkedIn.

Bonus Mistake: Unsolicited Sales Pitches
I really don’t need to explain this any further.  If you want success on LinkedIn provide value and communicate your messages indirectly.  Direct sales pitches are more likely to have a negative impact on your efforts.

If you would like to build a solid foundation on LinkedIn my “LinkedIn MBA” guide is a great resource.  Its currently priced low at $4.97 for two reasons:

1.  I want as many people as possible to build a solid foundation on LinkedIn.  This leads to more activity and helps every other member; and

2.  I want to create a desire in as many members as possible to get to the point that they want to go from using LinkedIn from a networking perspective to a money making perspective.  I call it going from “Connecting to collecting”.

That’s where the “LinkedIn MBA Workbook” ($7.97) and the “LinkedIn Marketing Secret Formula” ($39.97 but only $29.98 using discount code: x25rdr) come in to play.

These two resources will help you take the next step.  They do cost money but if you compare the cost to the time it would take to discover and learn the information included they are a cost effective way to learn LinkedIn.

Buy the books or simply continue reading the blog.  Either way you’ll likely know more about LinkedIn today than you did yesterday.

Warm Regards,

Sean Nelson
**Don’t keep the blog a secret.  Twitter, Digg, and other social sites are a great way to share with your friends and others.

Why are you on LinkedIn?

 

If you haven’t stopped to ask yourself this question, how do you know what actions you should be taking?  You have to have a defined purpose to take decisive action.

Most people join LinkedIn because either they heard or read about this site that could help them network more effectively.  Most people initially join for the networking component.  A recent question in Answers asked “Why are you on LinkedIn?”  The majority of responses related to meeting new people, connecting to former friends, coworkers, etc.  Few people actually answered “to grow my business”.

It’s almost as if there is this underlying perspective that trying to use LinkedIn to make money is a bad thing.  It’s not.  Social networking is about making friends.  Business networking is about making friends that lead to making money.  I didn’t join my local Chamber of Commerce because I thought the people were really nice (they are).  I wanted to meet some great people and develop relationships that lead to new business.

If you want to find success on LinkedIn you need to shout out loud “I’m on LinkedIn to make money”.  “Show me the money!”  Yell Jerry McGuire style.

Because here’s the point; if you can’t make money on LinkedIn why are you here?  You can join Facebook and some other social networking sites that do a better job of letting you interact with your network.  They have better tools and widgets.

LinkedIn currently has over 41 million members and the majority of people are not really that active.  Coincidentally the majority of people are not making money from being on LinkedIn.  If they were, they would be more active.  People tend to put their time and efforts to where they expect to find success.

Most people get the social component of LinkedIn which is connecting to others.  Where there is some work to do is figuring out how to go from connecting to collecting (as in new client’s or dollars).  This requires some work, some consistency, and some time.

You need to first build your foundation and then move on to strategically using LinkedIn.

The fastest way to build your foundation is to tap into the resources provided by others sharing their thoughts and expertise.  This blog is one of several that share valuable information for free.  You also should consider investing in learning LinkedIn by purchasing one or more of the LinkedIn “How to” books available.

When I first got serious about learning how to use LinkedIn I bought a book about it.  This one book allowed me to tap into the knowledge and experience of the author.  What I learned I could have learned on my own, but it would have taken time.

The book I purchased was $19.99.  At the time based on my income and a 40 hour week I determined that each hour of my time was worth $50.  That book cost me the equivalent of 24 minutes worth of work.

If I tried to learn everything in the book on my own it would have likely taken me at least 25 hours if not more.  These 25 hours represented $1,250 at $50 per hour.  $20 or $1,250 in time, the decision was easy.

Once your foundation is built, you can begin to focus on using LinkedIn more strategically.  It’s a step by step process and your profile and credibility will play an important part in the success of your strategic efforts.

So going back to the beginning, “Why are you on LinkedIn?”

 

**If you would like more information on building your LinkedIn foundation the LinkedIn MBA ($1.97) and the LinkedIn MBA Workbook ($7.97) are excellent resources.

If you’re ready to take the next step and to start using LinkedIn strategically the LinkedIn Marketing Secret Formula is the first LinkedIn book to focus exclusively on how to communicate your message to tens of thousands of LinkedIn members. (Priced at $39.97 the 40% Blog Reader Discount – $23.98 – will end tomorrow.  Use Discount Code: x40sbsbr in the shopping cart)

5 Key Benefits to LinkedIn Groups

 

Groups are the hottest thing to hit LinkedIn in the last six months.  Sure they’ve been around longer than that, but without any functionality they were a shell of a feature.  Updates that allowed member to communicate through discussion posts and news articles have changed their relevance.

Something as simple as a functional group directory made it possible to find groups to meet specific purposes.  If you live in Georgia and want to join a group with other Georgia Residents you can search on Georgia and find a group such as Linked Georgia.  If you’re self-employed in Atlanta a quick search find the Self Employed Atlanta group.

There have also been some goodies added for Group owners.  You can now send a weekly announcement to the group.  You can configure automatic email responses to group inquiries to join, a welcome message to new members, and messages to those you decline or block from future requests to join.

Groups are becoming a powerful tool in using LinkedIn effectively.   Here are 5 Key Benefits to LinkedIn Groups

1.  Groups expand your Reach
You might have 500 people in your direct network (first degree connections) but join the top 50 groups on LinkedIn and you’ll have a group reach of close to two million members.  I live in Georgia and the top 50 groups have over 40,000 members.

You likely can’t join the top 50 groups on LinkedIn or in a state…there are requirement’s that you might not meet.  Doesn’t matter because you want to make sure you join the top 50 groups that are relevant to you.

I have a combination of national and local group that I’ve joined.  The national groups were chosen because of how they might impact Linked Intuition, this blog.  The local Georgia groups were chosen for their relevance to my two insurance companies, Atlanta Health & Like and XL Benefits.

Nationally my reach is about 525,000; locally it’s about 20,000.  That’s more than the 650 direct connections that I have.

2.  Groups allow you to communicate
If I want to talk with other insurance professionals I can post discussion questions or statement on my two insurance related groups.  If I have thoughts or questions about online marketing I can tap my marketing related groups.  Each group is based on a common factor and that allows you to target your communication to an appropriate group.

The news articles section allows you to share relevant information with fellow group members.  It’s a great way to provide value and to drive traffic.

Over the last 3 months my blog traffic has grown from 2,200 visitors in March to over 20,000 in May (based on the results in June, visits are on track to exceed 40,000).  LinkedIn groups have been a large part of the growth.

3.  Customized Group Views allow you to parse information
Under the member tab of each group there is an advanced search function.  On that page you can choose to view a basic or expanded view of the members.  There’s a third option currently available that I love:  Create a New View.

When you create your view you can choose what information is displayed about each member with the search results.  I’m not going to list the options; you should play with the feature to see what’s available and how it is relevant. (a word of caution – this option is designated as a Premium feature and will only be available to Free Account holders for an undefined duration.  Just be aware that it will disappear one day.)

Here’s an example of how I am using the feature.  I have some groups that I am trying to grow.  Some of the other groups that I belong to have members that would benefit from joining my groups, they just may not be aware of my groups.  I could post a group announcement in the other groups that might be seen (you also want to make sure that it is OK with the other group owners to do so).  Or I can notify the people directly about the group.

I just need to know who in the other groups do not belong to my groups.  Creating a custom view allows me to do this.  Here’s how:

~Go to Advanced Search under the Members tab in a group

~Click on the View drop down and choose Create New View…a pop up with options appears

~Click on the check boxes for  Groups, Location, and In Common

~Name the View and save it

Now when you search the group it will display the member’s name, there location (if that matters), usually up to 4 groups, and a hypertext link to the number of groups in common.  Click on the Groups in Common link and it will show you all of your common groups.  You’ll know whether or not the person is a member of your group

If not you can now send them a notice of an additional group they might be interested in.  I try to send out about 50 to 100 notices a week and my groups have been growing.

4.  Groups can help you expand your connections
Remember groups are made up of people that you have something in common with.  The North Fulton Business Group is a local Georgia group of people networking in and around Atlanta.  These are people that it makes sense for me to be connected to.  I can simply go through the membership list to find people that I want to connect to.

There is a formula that I use in sending connection invitations within groups:

1. Introduce myself as a fellow group member

2. State that the purpose of the group is to network, so in that spirit I am extending an invitation to connect

3. Add a value statement…how I can help them

4. Include my full name

When you send an invitation you have several factors working in your favor.

1. People are open to connecting when there is common ground

2. People are looking to build their own networks

3. Membership in the same Group and having common connections establishes a baseline of credibility

4. By writing a LinkedIn blog and offering to help them I’m providing value.

You just need to identify the value you bring to the table and offer to help others.

Be careful because there are some who might be offended that someone they don’t personally know would try to connect to them and they hit the “I Don’t Know this Person” button.

I’ve seen a lot of invitations that add a message at the bottom saying “If you choose to not accept this invitation please Archive the email instead of choosing the “I Don’t Know” response.  This will hopefully prevent someone that doesn’t understand the effects of clicking the “I Don’t Know” button, but there will still be some that do.

If enough people choose the “I Don’t Know” button you may find your account restricted or suspended.  Send out invitations in small amounts and track the responses you are receiving.  **Personalizing your email will make a difference in your responses.

5.  Group Ownership is a Great Way to Create Your Community
The value in creating a group is that if the group grows large enough you increase your exposure to other LinkedIn members.  The more value your group provides the more likely you are to receive positive benefits from starting and managing the group.

If you choose to start a group, first look to see if there are any similar groups in existence.  Competing groups could impact your ability to grow the group and you might be better served by simply joining the existing group

As the owner of the Group you have the additional ability to designate discussion posts as a Featured Post which keeps them at the top of the discussion board, approve and remove members, and send out a weekly announcement.  Group owners often can influence the direction of a group since they are seen as the group leader by members.

You can be a manger or an owner of up to 10 groups.  Starting a group is easy.  You simply create a name, create a large and small group logo, and write a description of the purpose of the group.  The hardest part of starting a group is growing the membership.  Groups rarely grow on their own until they reach at least 100 members.  There are 1,000’s of groups on LinkedIn with less than 5 members.

Make sure the group will be of interest to a significant number of people.  A group such as a BNI networking chapter may only be able to add 20 to 30 members based on the chapters size, where a group for all BNI groups would have the ability to grow tremendously.

The final part of the puzzle is to invite a large number of people, at least 150 to 200, to join the group.  This is where having a large direct network will help you grow your group.  Not everyone will join and your goal should be to at least add 100 members.

I recently experimented with advertising one of my groups, Linked Georgia, on LinkedIn.  I decided I would commit $150 to promoting the group on LinkedIn.  On the positive side in one week I added over 100 people to the group.  The negative was that each new person cost $1.37 to add.

Financially it’s not sustainable to continue adding members at this cost and I’m not sure I would recommend this approach.  But if each of those people results in 10 others joining the group it could be huge.  I think growing this group is important to the members and to me personally.  I’m willing to invest the time and some money to help it reach the group goal of 10% of Georgia residents (which is about 100,000 people)

There are currently 41 million people on LinkedIn and 300,000 groups.  Doing the math, that’s 136 members per group.  With a limit of 50 groups per month you’re competing with other groups for members.  The time to grow your group is now.

Wrap Up
That’s it for today’s discussion of groups.  Groups have changed how people interact and find value on LinkedIn.  If you do not belong to 50 groups, do so.  If you’re not interacting with your groups through the discussion board and news boards you’re leaving clubs in your bag.  If you’re a group owner and you’re not actively promoting your groups you may find you get left behind.

What do you think?  Did I miss anything significant?

**If you are still trying to figure out LinkedIn, the LinkedIn MBA will help you build a solid foundation on LinkedIn and prepare you to start using it strategically.

For those ready for the next step the LinkedIn Marketing Secret Formula will do that.  The 40% discount is available through Monday June 8th.  Use discount code:  x40sbsbr in the shopping cart.

Both books are available at www.linkedintuition.com/book.html.

 

The Ultimate LinkedIn Guide

90% of the users on LinkedIn are still trying to figure it out.  Many of these people won’t take the time required to develop a solid foundation.  My new eBook, “The LinkedIn MBA” is available based on the price you set.

linkedmba_smallThis is the book I wrote to explain to friends the purpose and use of each page and link on LinkedIn.  I like to say its “Painstakingly Detailed”.  If you have laser focus, read it cover to cover.  If you’re like me, periodically focus challenged, you may be better of using it as a reference guide.

If you have a question about Answers, read the Answers chapter.  Need to know something about Account Settings, read the Account Settings chapter.  The book’s chapter structure is based on the navigational structure of LinkedIn.  No appendix needed.

It’s the guide that I wished I had in June of 2006, 2007, and 2008.  For those of you still trying to get up to speed this book is for you.

There is also a number of people who are on LinkedIn that have not been able to take that next step to making LinkedIn a productive tool.  How do you go from connecting to monetization?  It’s not a short step.

It takes a strategy which has been the missing link in just about every LinkedIn book.  There are some folks who have connected into opportunities, reconnected into opportunities, and found business, but it’s been hit or miss.

LI_marketing_secret_formula_smallThe LinkedIn Marketing Secret Formula” seeks to change the dynamic by laying out a strategy that you can use on a daily basis to communicate your message to tens of thousands of LinkedIn members.  It shows you how to get under the sales radar.  You’ll learn how to conduct ongoing marketing activities to drive activity.

Some people will argue that there’s no place on LinkedIn for sales or marketing.  I agree and disagree.  There’s no place for up front direct sales pitches and SPAM.  There is a place for using the available LinkedIn tools to provide value and communicate your message indirectly.

Some stress that it’s a networking tool not a lead generation tool.  My response is that I like my connections but I love my new client’s.  It should be both.

While typing this post I received two calls from people needing help with their health insurance.  One was from a Chamber friend (offline networking is still important) passing on a referral; the other was from someone who I have never spoken to before.  Because of the strategies detailed in the “LinkedIn Marketing Secret Formula” I was top of mind when she had a health insurance need.

If you’re still trying to understand LinkedIn and the available features download a copy of “The LinkedIn MBA”.

If you’re ready to take the next step and learn how to strategically use LinkedIn to grow your business get a copy of the “LinkedIn Marketing Secret Formula“.  The book is regularly $39.95 but for the next seven days I am offering a 40% discount, so the end price is $23.97.  To get the discount use the following Discount code:  x40sbsbr

I also detail in the book how I used LinkedIn to drive traffic to my blog growing from 2,200 visits in March to over 20,000 in May.

For those of you who have read the Linked Intuition blog over the last 17 months, thank you.  It has been my pleasure to be part of your LinkedIn experience.