The 4 C’s of Social Media

Back in 1998 I started building my first website for an Insurance company. The CEO had heard that in one of my graduate school classes I had had to submit a class project using html. He decided that I was just the person he was looking for to build the companies first website.

It was true that I had used html in that project, but all I really did was sit next to a project member while he copied snippets of code from a book to create our first web page. At the time I started creating the companies website it was cool and cutting edge to have a website but it wasn’t necessarily viewed as a business requirement. That would change over the next year.

In 2010 I think we’re at a similar point. Social Media/Networking is still viewed by some as not a business requirement but I expect that will change over the next year. Some will do so because they get it, others because they fear getting left behind. Even if they’re not sure what it is they might be left behind by.

To start off the new year I’m going to discuss what I call the 4 C’s of social media. These are the four concepts we focus on with our clients. Continue reading The 4 C’s of Social Media

Social Media Process in a Picture

Yesterday I wrote about 6 tools that we use at SONARconnects to create and implement social media/networking strategies for ourselves and our client’s.  This got me to thinking about how to simplify things by laying out the process in a graphic.  Below is the result of that exercise.  I hope it helps you see the overall picture.

Social Media Process flow

Does this help you see things more clearly?

Social Media Sonar provides the following four resources for FREE… 1.  The Blog, 2. The Online Marketing/Social Media Blueprint, 3.  Conversion Rate Optimization Guide, 4.  Resource Center.  If these help you implement your own online marketing program, great. We love helping people. If you decide you need some help, great. We love new clients.  Contact Us if we can help you.

6 Social Media/Networking Tools for Businesses

social media swirlMany people use the term “Social Media” to represent the vast array of social networking sites, social media sites, and tools available.  What we’re really talking about is the Social Web.  The Social Web is made up of Social Networking and Social Media.

Social Networking is about sharing the conversation.  Social Media is about sharing content.  Combined they form an effective toolbox to grow you business.

Sharing the Conversation
There are hundreds social networking sites available and you could spend unlimited time trying to determine how to use each.  I’m looking to use social networking in as efficient manner as possible so I focus on two networking sites and one hybrid.

The two sites that I use are LinkedIn and Facebook.  Both allow me to build communities of people, engage and interact with them, and communicate to on an ongoing basis.  The results may include branding but the end goal is always monetization.

LinkedIn
LinkedIn is a natural fit from a membership perspective.  The average household income per member is $109,000, close to 80% have attended college, and 49% are decision makers.  The average LinkedIn member is a great prospect.

LinkedIn is a somewhat closed environment and it takes time and effort to build the right communities and typically most of our communications are indirect in nature.  I want those in my networks to see the messages I deliver over time and to get to know, like, and trust me so that when they have a need for the services I provide, I’m top of mind.

It also doesn’t hurt that you have the ability to prospect and then see how you connect into each opportunity. Continue reading 6 Social Media/Networking Tools for Businesses

Social Networking Stats-Regular Users Vs. Total Members

A lot gets written up in press releases, blog posts, Tweets, and other communications about the number of members on the various sites.   There’s a huge difference though between the number of users each site has and the number of users who are consistently interacting with others.

I recently came across some statistics that I’m going to share.   These statistics were revealed in a study by Anderson Analytics and you can view the report by clicking on the company name.   The study estimates that there are 110 million people who regularly use Social Networking Sites (SNS).

On average, users of SNS sites login to the sites 5 days a week, 4 times a day and spend about 1 hour on SNS each day.   While not explicitly stated this is what I would assume that they consider a regular user. So here are the top sites with the number of users and the number of regular users in parentheses.

5 Top Ways to Leverage LinkedIn

This is the third part in a series on the 3 Basic Keys of LinkedIn.  Part one covered “optimizing your profile” and part two looked at “building your networks”.  If you followed the tips and strategies you should now have a pretty good profile and be on the way to expanding your reach on LinkedIn.

Leveraging LinkedIn simply means that you are making it work for you.  You’re in control and taking the actions that support why you are on LinkedIn.  I’m here to make money so everything that I do is geared to communicating a message to my networks.

Over the last two years I’ve learned how to use the various social media/networking sites to develop new business for my Individual Health and Employee Benefits companies.  Last week alone I received 3 calls from prospects.  What’s interesting about that is that I’ve updated my profile and activity to focus more on the social media consulting that I’m doing.

My prior and continued activity has allowed people to get to know, like and trust me.  So, even though the focus isn’t 100% on health insurance it still drives results.  And I’m starting to see results from the social media/networking side as well, having received a call from a technology company to discuss their social media/networking strategy.  Four leads in a week with a potential of over $20,000 in revenue.

Social media/networking works if you leverage the tools available.  With that in mind, here are 5 Top Ways to Leverage LinkedIn: Continue reading 5 Top Ways to Leverage LinkedIn

Radio LinkedIn Interview with Gravity Free Radio

radiox graphic

This past week Erik Wolf and Stephanie Frost, hosts of the Gravity Free Radio show were desperate for a guest so they turned to Scott Dunn and myself.  I’m always happy to be filler for Erik and Stephanie.

In addition to the show Erik and Stephanie run Zero-G Creative, a killer web design, graphic design, and web tools company that I would highly recommend to anyone looking for a unique website and online presence.

The show covers LinkedIn bouncing from building your network, optimizing your profile, and leveraging LinkedIn.  There’s a better explanation on the show at the Gravity Free Radio show

To listen to the show go to  http://gravityfreeradio.com/archives/187

Your 2 Critical LinkedIn Networks

Last week I covered some tips to Optimize Your Profile which was the first part of the Three Basic Keys to LinkedIn.  Today we cover the second Key…Building Your Network.
You can have the best profile on LinkedIn but if your network is not significant enough it won’t matter.  You have to connect to others.  If you’re more of an open networker, you’ll find it easier to build your network.  If you’re more restrictive in whom you connect to then you’re going to have to get out and meet people.
Your Direct Network:
I’ve heard different number as far as how many direct connections you need to have…100, 250, 500, or more.  What I do know is that 100 connections is probably better than 50 and 500 is probably better than 250.  My thoughts are that if you get active in your community you should be able to build up at least 500 local connections.
I got lucky on LinkedIn.  When I received my first referral from another member I only had 19 connections.  That was enough to wake me up to the potential.  The spigot didn’t start flowing immediately but as my network grew little by little so did the referrals.
Another benefit I noticed was that connecting on LinkedIn added another degree of depth to my relationships within my chamber.  It gave me a point of reference and an immediate ice breaker the next time I saw the connection.
During the next year I grew my network by sending connection invitations to everyone that attended the networking events I attended.  In the invitation I simply said, “Our paths crossed today at the Chamber meeting.  We didn’t have an opportunity to meet but I am using LinkedIn to enhance my networking.  I’d like to extend an invitation to connect”.
If I actually met them then I added a note about our talk.  Personalizing your invitations will increase the likelihood of it being accepted.  Avoid using the canned LinkedIn invitation, it doesn’t say much about you or why you want to connect.  It makes a difference.
I currently have about 2,800 direct connections and about 800 of these are local.  Some of these connections I know some are simply part of a network.   I’ve heard the arguments that connecting to those you don’t know devalues your network.  I simply disagree.
Last week I introduced a connection I didn’t know to another connection I didn’t know.  I was simply the hub in the process but the introduction was made.  The value of that introduction remains to be seen but an opportunity has been created.
How you choose to connect is a decision you have to make.  For me open networking has been a good choice.
Your Group Network
Most people are aware of their group network but don’t realize that they have a Group network as well.  The people that belong to the same groups as you are represent a network.  I define a network on LinkedIn based on my ability to communicate a message.  Groups allow you to do that.
If your primary reason for being on LinkedIn to network then the only value in groups is their ability to help you find more people to connect to.  If you’re on LinkedIn to make money, and you should be, then you’ll realize that the value of groups is that they extend your reach.
I may have 2,800 connections but the 50 groups I’m in now have over 800,000 people.  Locally the groups I’m in extend my reach from 800 local professionals to over 30,000.  That’s a healthy extension of my reach on LinkedIn.
The beauty of groups is that they are formed around a uniting factor.  It could be a location such as Linked Georgia (have to be a resident of Georgia), a type of employment such as Self Employed Atlanta (be self employed and live in the Atlanta Metro), and alumni group such as Georgia southern University (graduated from the University), or even based on LinkedIn recommendations such as Top Recommended People (have 10 recommendations or more).
You simply need to identify the groups that your prospects belong to and join.  Then begin interacting and communicating with them.
Your networks represent opportunity.  Each person in your networks is a potential client, referral partner, business alliance, or simply a hub that could help you connect into an opportunity.  You determine the size and scope.
Next week we’ll talk about how to start leveraging LinkedIn to take advantage of your “killer” profile and the network you’re building.

Last week I covered some tips to Optimize Your Profile which was the first part of the Three Basic Keys to LinkedIn.  Today we cover the second Key…Building Your Network.

You can have the best profile on LinkedIn but if your network is not significant enough it won’t matter.  You have to connect to others.  If you’re more of an open networker, you’ll find it easier to build your network.  If you’re more restrictive in whom you connect to then you’re going to have to get out and meet people.

Your Direct Network:
I’ve heard different numbers as far as how many direct connections you need to have…100, 250, 500, or more.  I’m not sure that there is a definitive number, but what I do know is that 100 connections is probably better than 50 and 500 is probably better than 250.  My thoughts are that if you get active in your community you should be able to build up at least 500 local connections.

I got lucky on LinkedIn.  When I received my first referral from another member I only had 19 connections.  That was enough to wake me up to the potential.  The spigot didn’t start flowing immediately but as my network grew little by little so did the referrals.

Another benefit I noticed was that connecting on LinkedIn added another degree of depth to my relationships within my chamber.  It gave me a point of reference and an immediate ice breaker the next time I saw the connection.

During the next year I grew my network by sending connection invitations to everyone that attended the networking events I attended.  In the invitation I simply said, “Our paths crossed today at the Chamber meeting.  We didn’t have an opportunity to meet but I am using LinkedIn to enhance my networking.  I’d like to extend an invitation to connect”.

If I actually met them then I added a note about our conversation.  Personalizing your invitations will increase the likelihood of it being accepted.  Avoid using the canned LinkedIn invitation, it doesn’t say much about you or why you want to connect.  It makes a difference.

I currently have about 2,800 direct connections and about 800 of these are local.  Some of these connections I know some are simply part of a network.   I’ve heard the arguments that connecting to those you don’t know devalues your network.  I simply disagree.

Last week I introduced a connection I didn’t know to another connection I didn’t know.  I was simply the hub in the process but the introduction was made.  The value of that introduction remains to be seen but an opportunity has been created.

How you choose to connect is a decision you have to make.  For me openly connecting has been a good decision.

Your Group Network
Most people are aware of their Direct network but don’t realize that they have a Group network as well.  The people that belong to the same groups as you represent a network.  I define a network on LinkedIn based on my ability to communicate a message.  Groups allow you to do that.

If your primary reason for being on LinkedIn is to network then the only value in groups is their ability to help you find more people to connect to.  If you’re on LinkedIn to make money, and you should be, then you’ll realize that the value of groups is that they extend your reach.

I may have 2,800 direct connections but the 50 groups I’m in now have over 800,000 people.  Locally the groups I’m in extend my reach from 800 local professionals to over 30,000.  That’s a healthy extension of my reach on LinkedIn.

The beauty of groups is that they are formed around a uniting factor.  It could be a location such as Linked Georgia (have to be a resident of Georgia), a type of employment such as Self Employed Atlanta (be self employed and live in the Atlanta Metro), an alumni group such as Georgia southern University (graduated from the University), or even based on LinkedIn recommendations such as Top Recommended People (have 10 recommendations or more).

You simply need to identify the groups that your prospects belong to and join.  Then begin interacting and communicating with them.

Wrap Up:
Your networks represent opportunity.  Each person in your networks is a potential client, referral partner, business alliance, or simply a hub that could help you connect into an opportunity.  They also provide a larger audience to provide value to.  You determine the size and scope.

Next week we’ll talk about how to start leveraging LinkedIn to take advantage of your “killer” profile and the network you’re building.  What’s your connection strategy?

**If you would like to learn more about how to use LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Flickr, and Business Blogs to grow you business, SONAR Connects offers two options:

  1. Social Media Training that teaches you how to optimize your accounts, build communities of friends, followers, and connections, and how to monetize social networking and social media.
  2. Social Networking/Media Management: We take on the responsibility for managing your social media accounts including creating and writing your business blog.

Social Media Sonar provides the following four resources for FREE… 1.  The Blog, 2. The Online Marketing/Social Media Blueprint, 3.  Conversion Rate Optimization Guide, 4.  Resource Center.  If these help you implement your own online marketing program, great. We love helping people. If you decide you need some help, great. We love new clients.  Contact Us if we can help you.

The Secret to Twitter

The Secret to Twitter
Guess what, it’s the same as on LinkedIn, Facebook, and other social media sites.  Provide value to others and you will eventually benefit in return.  Eventually might be right away or it might be a year from now.
On LinkedIn I can answer a question in depth, I can write a detailed recommendation, and post discussion questions and information in groups.  In each I have time to lay out a set of facts and follow up with information to support the point or to share information.
On Twitter you can pretty much put a short statement out and that’s it.  140 characters doesn’t seem like a lot, but you can accomplish a lot with brevity.
The number one use I see in using Twitter is to share information.  It might be a link to an interesting news article, it might be a quick answer, or it might be a link to one of my blog posts where I can provide valuable information.
For me that’s the value.  I can capture attention and clicks to my site by writing a good headline tweet and directing people to my blog.  The responder benefits from the information I share in my blog post.  I benefit by adding blog visitors that hopefully find value and continue to return.
It all comes back to providing value.  If I disguise a spam post as a legitimate post over time I’ll render my account worthless.  That’s why you see a lot of the same links to spam posted by different “people”.  Ever notice that the picture normally all look like young models?  Profile photo’s straight from istockphoto.
If I provide value though then my credibility is enhanced and the next time I post a link to a new blog post, I’m likely to get a return visit.  Even better I may wind up with several retweets which helps spread my link and further increase traffic.
As a final word, I use Twitter for business purposes only.  I don’t post that I’m enjoying a latte at Starbucks…who cares.  Maybe if I were Chris Brogan that might be news.  He’s built his brand and people are interested in whatever he does.  People read my blog to know how to more effectively use LinkedIn and other social media.  I know my place.
Think about why you are on Twitter, and if it’s a business person, act appropriately.  Post Tweets that support your brand, provide value, share good information, and be yourself.
What do you think?

twitter largeThe other day someone asked me what the secret to Twitter was?  Guess what, it’s the same as on LinkedIn, Facebook, and other social networking/media sites.  Provide value to others and you will eventually benefit in return.  Eventually might be right away or it might be a year from now.

On LinkedIn I can answer a question in depth, I can write a detailed recommendation, and post discussion questions and information in groups.  In each I have time to lay out a set of facts and follow up with information to support the point or to share information.

On Twitter you can pretty much put a short statement out and that’s it.  140 characters doesn’t seem like a lot, but you can accomplish a lot with brevity.

The number one use I see in using Twitter is to share information.  It might be a link to an interesting news article, it might be a quick answer, or it might be a link to one of my blog posts where I can provide valuable information.

For me that’s the value.  I can capture attention and clicks to my site by writing a good headline tweet and directing people to my blog.  The responder benefits from the information I share in my blog post.  I benefit by adding blog visitors that hopefully find value and continue to return.

It all comes back to providing value.  If I disguise a spam post as a legitimate post over time I’ll render my account worthless.  That’s why you see a lot of the same links to spam posted by different “people”.  Ever notice that the pictures normally all look like young models?  Profile photo’s straight from istockphoto.

If I provide value though then my credibility is enhanced and the next time I post a link to a new blog post, I’m likely to get a return visit.  Even better I may wind up with several retweets which helps spread my link and further increase traffic.

As a final word, I use Twitter for business purposes only.  I don’t post that I’m enjoying a latte at Starbucks…who cares.  Maybe if I were Chris Brogan that might be news.  He’s built his brand and people are interested in whatever he does.  People read my blog to know how to more effectively use LinkedIn and other social media.  I know my place.

Think about why you are on Twitter, and if it’s a business purpose, act appropriately.  Post Tweets that support your brand, provide value, share good information, and be yourself.

What do you think?

Social Media Sonar provides the following four resources for FREE… 1.  The Blog, 2. The Online Marketing/Social Media Blueprint, 3.  Conversion Rate Optimization Guide, 4.  Resource Center.  If these help you implement your own online marketing program, great. We love helping people. If you decide you need some help, great. We love new clients.  Contact Us if we can help you.

5 Tips to Optimize Your LinkedIn Profile

blog 5 tips to optimize profileSeveral times a month I speak at events talking to others about how to use LinkedIn more effectively.  I’m constantly revising the presentations; trying to come up with one that balances showing new members what LinkedIn is while providing value to those that have been members for a while.

The latest presentation focuses on the three areas I wrote about in the 3 Basic Keys to LinkedIn:  Optimizing Your Profile, Building Your Network, and Leveraging LinkedIn.  From this I have put together a list of Tips for each area.  I’ll cover each in separate posts over the next two weeks.  Today we focus on 5 Tips to Optimize Your Profile.

Tip 1:  Have a Relevant Profile Photo

No discussion on creating a better profile can exclude the impact of the photo.  Having a photo simply allows people to place a face with a name.  Not having a photo says that you don’t get “it”.

Having a logo, a product shot, a cartoon etc. isn’t much better than not having a photo.  Doing this also says you don’t get “it”.  Having a photo that is hard to see, doesn’t match your brand, or that is not properly formatted says the same thing.

What is “It”?  “It” is the fact that social networking is about people interacting with people.  Not with companies, products, logos, or cartoon characters.  Being a professional network for business people, What might be acceptable on MySpace of Facebook doesn’t work on LinkedIn.

Tip 2:  Title verses a Tag Line

Titles tell people what you are.  Tag lines can tell people what you can do for them.  For example, there’s a huge difference between “Social Media Consultant” and “Helping business build communities and monetize social networking and media”.

If I’m the CEO for a company maybe I stick with the title.  If I’m a sales person I’d rather people know what I can do for them.  Remember whenever your mini profile is displayed (answering a question, posting a discussion question, posting a news article, etc.) viewers see your photo,  name, title/tag line.

Tip 3:  Customize Your URL’s

In your profile you have the ability to add 3 web links.  Typically you see these on a profile listed as My Website, My Blog, My Company, etc.  Each of these can easily be customized so that My Company is changed to SONARconnects, or MY Blog is Social Media Sonar Blog.

To make the change simply go to you “Edit Profile” page and click on the “edit” text link next to your URL’s.  Then click on the drop down box and choose “Other”.  This allows you to then type in a name to list for the link.

You also are assigned a URL for your Public Profile page.  It typically looks like this:  http://www.linkedin.com/pub/sean-nelson/10/6a4/3b6.  A customized Public Profile page URL would look like this:  http://www.linkedin.com/in/seannelson.

The customized web links and the customized profile URL will have an effect on your ranking in the search engines.

Tip 4:  Add Applications

Your profile is made up of a lot of static information.  You can update it over time which is good for two reasons:

1.  You want the information listed to be as up to date as possible; and

2.  Every time you update your profile your network is notified that something has changed.  This generates profile visits.

Applications allow you to present information in a variety of formats.  You can add videos,  PowerPoint presentations, white papers, brochures, one-pager’s, case studies, etc.  Not everyone visiting your profile will view the information, but for those who want to know more about you, this is a great way to share information about who you are and what you do.

For video I prefer the Goggle Presentations application.  For presentations I use Slide Share.  And for files I use Boxnet.  I also use the Word Press application to import my blog into my profile.

Others are using the Amazon application to share information on the books they like and TripIt to show others where they are traveling to.  You don’t have to use every application but a few can take your profile from 2 dimensional to 3 dimensional.

Tip 5:  Add Keywords to Your Profile

Your profile is searchable, whether it’s on LinkedIn or from search engines such as Google.  The more effectively you use keywords in your profile the better you will display in search results.  I’m not a fan of adding a string of keywords, but with the various places to add information you can sprinkle them naturally in your descriptions.

I wrote the LinkedIn MBA Workbook to provide a systematic way for someone to build a “Killer” profile.  The workbook is over 20 pages so there are a lot of other tips to optimize your profile.  If you do nothing but focus on the five I’ve listed above you will have a better profile tomorrow than you did today.

Your profile is where people that find you on LinkedIn begin forming their first impression.  Make it a good one and make sure that when they leave your profile they know exactly what you do and how you can help them.

What are some profile tips that I should have included?

**If you would like to learn more about how to use LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Flickr, and Business Blogs to grow you business, SONAR Connects offers two options:

  1. Social Media Training that teaches you how to optimize your accounts, build communities of friends, followers, and connections, and how to monetize social networking and media.
  2. Social Networking/Media Management: We take on the responsibility for managing your social media accounts including creating and writing your blog.

Social Media Sonar provides the following four resources for FREE… 1.  The Blog, 2. The Online Marketing/Social Media Blueprint, 3.  Conversion Rate Optimization Guide, 4.  Resource Center.  If these help you implement your own online marketing program, great. We love helping people. If you decide you need some help, great. We love new clients.  Contact Us if we can help you.

Why the Change from Linked Intuition to Social Media Sonar

Welcome to the old Linked Intuition blog and the new Social Media Sonar blog.  First let’s address why the blog changed.

“Cease and Desist”!  That’s the headline in the email I received from LinkedIn on July 10th.  It seems that they are worried that some people might be confused about my blog and interpret it as a part of LinkedIn.  There’s also this thing called Trademark.

The blogs name was Linked Intuition which in itself is not an issue.  The problem is that when you combine the terms for a URL…LinkedIntuition… it includes the letters Linkedin which is where the trademark issues comes up.

When I received the email I forwarded a copy to Brad Crose, and attorney who works in the field of copy write and trademark (more out of curiosity since I had already decided to change the domain name).  Brad was a great help in understanding the various angles.  If you ever need help in these areas he’s a great resource.

LinkedIn owns the trademark to LinkedIn and they have every right to do what is in their power to protect their trademark.  I don’t disagree with that.  I don’t even disagree with their asking me to stop.  Once again it’s their right to take action that they feel they need to take to protect their trademark.

I do think they miss the point though.  LinkedIn is part of the Social Media landscape and a huge component of that is fostering community.  The blog was a part of that community and 50,000 visitors each month participated to some extent by visiting it.  From a social media perspective LinkedIn should be celebrating the fact that this large number of people are looking for more information about how to utilize LinkedIn more effectively.  Rather than take an adversarial position they should be trying to figure out how to engage the people advocating their service.

The Linked Intuition blog isn’t the only blog doing this, there are several sites that do a great job as well.  All provide free publicity to LinkedIn.  These sites are doing LinkedIn’s job for them by teaching people how to use it more effectively.  If LinkedIn was doing a great job of teaching it’s users how to use it effectively, would 50,000 people come to this blog each month to learn from me?  Or the other blogs for that matter.

For my part the change comes at a good time.  I’ve written about how I’ve been an insurance broker for the last 8 years and really learned LinkedIn in order to grow my business.  Writing the blog and the three LinkedIn books and Workbook have been a way to share what I’ve learned with others.  This activity has opened new doors.

New Opportunity
I’ve recently partnered with Sonarconnects, an advertising agency here in Atlanta, to help small businesses understand how to use social media to grow their business.  This includes Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Flickr, blogs, and LinkedIn.  As I start this new opportunity its a great time to expand the conversation.

I plan to continue providing the same great tips and strategies about LinkedIn that my readers have come to expect.  You’ll just start to see some pieces on the other components.  With the expansion I’ll also likely start bringing in guest authors from time to time.

Pardon the Mess
For a short period things may get a little confusing.  To help the readers make the transition the first thing I plan to do is to forward all of the Linked Intuition links to the corresponding pages of the new blog.  If you bookmarked the old site now would be a great time to update those bookmarks.  If you see a Linked Intuition link out there I would appreciate a heads up or a message to the site posting the link.  Some links will be lost but over time hopefully these will be less of an issue.

When I started the Linked Intuition blog it was no where on the radar…several million blogs had more traffic.  As the site disappears it had moved to one of the top 165,000 sites based on Alexa.com data (the new blog debuts at number 4.9+ million).  That’s a testament to the thousands of readers who took the time to read the blog , post comments, and link to it.

A Moment of Thanks
Thanks to LinkedIn for making a great service.  They have 41+ million different perspectives of what LinkedIn should be and for the most part get it right.

Thanks to Nate Kieveman of Linked Strategies for immediately wanting to jump to my defense.

Thanks to Ross Dodwell owner of the group Top Recommended People for constantly pushing the blog, the books, and just being of service.  Join his group if you have 10 recommendations.

Thanks to the sites that have linked back to the blog.

Thanks to those who have taken the time to retweet my posts.

And thank you for reading and participating in the conversation.

Warm Regards,

Sean Nelson